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We embrace the process of transformation in Christ, both in ourselves and in others, through the practice of Centering Prayer.

It seems the interest to do Centering Prayer has died

Series: 
Q&A with Fr. Carl J. Arico

Q:  I had been practicing Centering Prayer since 2008. But for the past year it seems the interest to do it has died. I would rather say the rosary or chaplet of Divine Mercy. Please help me, how can I start again?

A:  I hear your desire to start Centering Prayer again, and your attraction to other forms of prayer.  This is all good, as Centering Prayer was never meant to be a standalone prayer.

Sitting in Centering Prayer, we are entering a marvelous garden of prayers, prayers which manifest as thanksgiving, repentance, adoration, intercession and more. Remember, prayer is relationship, which includes both our attraction to be with God and our response to God. As you are consenting to God’s presence and action in Centering Prayer, the Holy Spirit inspires different manifestations of prayer – of relationship. Outside of our time of Centering Prayer, each of us is attracted to different forms of prayer  as we journey with God. Your attraction to pray the rosary or the chaplet of the Divine Mercy is wonderful!  You are making a course adjustment, enkindling or rekindling your devotion to Mary the mother of God, the 20 mysteries in the life of Jesus or the power of forgiveness and mercy.

When we understand that prayer is relationship, it is not an either/or but both/and. Therefore, our prayer can flow from the receptive consent in Centering Prayer to the active devotions of the rosary and Divine Mercy.

Remember that we can embrace a variety of devotions to support our journey to transformation.  Be open to the prompting of the Holy Spirit. This scripture from Romans 8:26 comes to mind, ’for we do not know how we ought to pray, the Spirit himself pleads with God for us in groans that words cannot express .’

Love to hear from you.

A blessed New Year, 
Fr Carl